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Opioid Withdrawal Triggers Lead to Relapse

Combining the pain, fear, and opioid withdrawal symptoms often trigger relapse during recovery from opioid addiction. Proper management of symptoms during all phases of recovery can significantly improve the rate of success in recovery by alleviating common opioid withdrawal triggers that many fall victim to.

Opioid Withdrawal Triggers

Withdrawal from opioid addiction is often a physically and psychologically painful process where fear, pain, and physiological cravings often lead into a situation where relapse occurs. An addiction specialist can work with you to manage the opioid withdrawal symptoms which include emotional and physical distress, through medications such as Suboxone, Cognitive Behavioral therapy, or utilization of a network of adjunct recovery services.

Opioids in Both Prescription and Illegal Drugs

Opioids are drugs that are typically prescribed to treat pain. Opiates include prescription and illegal drugs such as morphine, Kadian, codeine, heroin, opium, hydrocodone, oxycodone, oxycontin, methadone, hydromorphone (Dilaudid), Vicodin, Percocet, Fentanyl (duragesic). Opiates may be naturally manufactured from the opium poppy or synthetically formulated. Prescription opioid medications are frequently misused and abused leading to addiction.

Millions Abuse Opioids in U.S.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse report that over 4-million people in the U.S. abuse opioids. Withdrawal occurs when stopping or decreasing the amount of opioids you have become accustomed to taking.

Common Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms

Opioid withdrawal triggers and symptoms vary from one person to another. Withdrawal symptoms may begin as early as 6 hours after stopping the drug. The most commonly reported withdrawal complaints include:

  • Muscle aches
  • Difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep
  • Agitation, irritability
  • Hot and cold sweats or goosebumps
  • Racing heart rate
  • Anxiety
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Stomach cramps
  • Depression
  • Drug cravings
  • Excessive yawning
  • Teary eyes and runny nose

Suboxone Addiction Specialist

Treatment, which includes management of opioid withdrawal triggers by a certified addiction specialist who is able to prescribe Suboxone, is vital to successful recovery and prevention of relapse. Call Dr. Hege for individualized attention to the complex process of addiction recovery.

Suboxone Vital in Opioid Addiction Recovery

Suboxone is vital in successful opioid addiction recovery. In the U.S the statistics show we have a national crisis on our hands – a government report published in March of 2018 indicate more than 115 Americans die every day after overdosing on opioids. The opioid addiction crisis includes misuse of prescription pain relievers where addiction to the medication takes over their lives, leaving them unable to just walk away from the drug.

Suboxone Prescription Restricted

Suboxone is a prescription medication designed for the treatment of opioid dependence and addiction. Following the enactment of the 2000 Drug Addiction Treatment Act (DATA) Suboxone was one of the first medications impacted where prescription privileges were restricted to only qualified Suboxone doctors who have successfully completed specific training and met certification requirements.

Suboxone Vital Ingredients

Suboxone is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone with each ingredient having a specific purpose:

  • Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist which means that while it does activate the brain’s opioid receptors to help relieve withdrawal and cravings, however works to help break the pattern of compulsive drug seeking behaviors
  • Naloxone is an opioid antagonist which works by discouraging people from trying to get high by injecting the Suboxone. For someone who is opioid dependent, the result of injecting Suboxone leads directly to withdrawal symptoms

Suboxone Vital to Recovery in Two Ways

The ingredient buprenorphine in Suboxone tricks the brain into thinking an opioid is in their system, suppressing the withdrawal symptoms and cravings, yet they do not feel high or get a euphoric effect. Buprenorphine is part of the Suboxone vital key as it blocks the brain’s opioid receptor for approximately 24 hours so that prescription or illegal opioid cannot “get in.” This 24-hour opioid block helps to prevent relapse, one day at a time.

The important second benefit to buprenorphine is the “ceiling effect” which means that taking more Suboxone than prescribed will not result in feeling high. For someone addicted to opioids this is an important feature of the medication that assists in your working toward recovery.

Benefits of Suboxone Treatment

If you are addicted to opioids and need help in your recovery process, Suboxone vital in your comprehensive treatment program when prescribed and managed by a Suboxone doctor. The major benefits of Suboxone treatment include:

  • Reduction in cravings
  • Reduction in painful withdrawal symptoms
  • Stabilization of symptoms experienced through recovery
  • Ability to focus on your addiction treatment program
  • Management by a qualified and certified addiction expert

Suboxone Doctor in Atlanta Area

If the time has come to take control of your life and recover from your opioid addiction struggle, call Dr. Hege, Atlanta psychiatrist, a certified addiction specialist and certified Suboxone doctor.  Confidential and convenient appointments available evenings and weekends to meet your individual life needs.

Opioid Addiction: Power Beyond Death

Opioid addiction has a powerful pull on those who use them, whether legally through prescription drug use or through illegal drugs such as heroin. Once addicted to opioids, a person typically requires professional intervention with medications such as Suboxone, as well as family and community support systems to beat the addiction. While the general public may not understand the intense addictive qualities of opioids, new research documentation may lead to greater awareness of the growing problem of opioid addiction in our society.

Addictive Cravings Detectable After Death

The Medical University of Vienna, Department of Forensic Medicine, published results in December 2016 that demonstrated addictive craving for opioid stimulation continues to exist up to nine days after a person has died. A protein in the brain’s reward center is altered with opioid use, making it more stable and able to react to an opioid stimulus in a type of memory function – this addictive craving can still be detected after death, indicating not only the power opioid addiction has, but the difficulty an addict has in trying to withdrawal from and quit opioids.

Post-Mortem Dependence Memory

The Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy reports on a study showing that the effects of chronic opioid stimulus can be identified post-mortem. The brain protein FosB that has been altered by opioid use, turns into DeltaFosB which becomes increasingly stimulated with chronic use and opioid addiction. DeltaFosB is found in the region where memory is formed which may make addiction and withdrawal all the more harder to achieve. DeltaFosB shows stimulation continues to exist nine days after the person has died – researchers believe that in living addicts the effect may last for months, making professional help all the more critical.

Psychiatric Opioid Addiction Treatment

When addictive cravings persist in the brain for months during and following withdrawal it is imperative to seek psychiatric opioid addiction treatment options. Call the office for a confidential appointment and expert care.

Buprenorphine Opioid Medications Treat Addiction

Buprenorphine is the generic name for Buprenex, Suboxone, Zubsolv, Bunavail, or Subutex to name a few. On March 29, 2016, the White House announced a proposal to increase a physician’s current patient limit of 100 for those prescribed buprenorphine, to 200 patients in order to effectively address the rising numbers of those with opioid addiction.

Suboxone and U.S. Opioid Epidemic

Suboxone and the other trade names for buprenorphine are used to treat opioid addiction and opioid use disorders in the U.S. which are now being officially addressed as an opioid epidemic. This increase in the number of patients one doctor can prescribe buprenorphine will be part of a package of public and private initiatives to address the rapidly growing problem.

Use of Buprenorphine in Treatment

Buprenorphine is the generic name for an opioid medication used to effectively treat opioid addiction. Patients may take the medications at home via a prescription. Treating opioid addiction in the home allows successful confidential treatment outside of an in-house addiction unit in the hospital or other opioid addiction facility.

Purpose of Buprenorphine Treatment

The National Alliance of Advocates for Buprenorphine Treatment, NAABT, describes the prescription and use of this medication as a suppressant for the debilitating symptoms of cravings and withdrawal. For those with an opioid addiction, buprenorphine gives the patient the ability to make positive long term changes that lead to a life without opioid addiction.

Trade Names of Buprenorphine

Buprenorphine is known by a variety of trade names, all of which require special training and certification in order to prescribe these medications. Trade names include:

  • Suboxone
  • Buprenex
  • Subutex
  • Butrans
  • Cizdol
  • Zubsolv
  • Bunavail
  • Belbuca

Doctor Able to Prescribe Suboxone

Dr. Hege has completed the training and holds the certification required in order to prescribe Suboxone and other buprenorphine mediations. In addition he has years of success in the treatment of opioid addiction.

If you want to end your opioid addiction and reclaim your life, give the office a call for a confidential appointment.